(Tim Jerome) Guidance Required

Discussion in 'PMP' started by _24034, Jun 30, 2018.

  1. _24034

    _24034 Member

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    Respected Sir,

    I gave my PMP exams on 27th of June. And I scored above target (Closing, Monitoring & Control) target ( Planning and Initiating), Needs Improvement in Executing.

    Overall result = Fail

    I had more questions type like what should have been done to avoid this situation. This was so unfamiliar to me. I have practised questions on Simplilearn but not even a single question was close to the actual.

    Please guide me, what should i do before scheduling my 2nd attempt


    I have read Pmbok 6 - 3times
    Rita Mulcahy - 2times

    And questions of Simplilearn.

    Please let me know when would be the right time to schedule my 2nd attempt. And what would be the sign of me being perfectly ready to pass?
     
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  2. tim jerome

    tim jerome Well-Known Member
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    First of all - you applied lots of effort. This is commendable. Now, you refine your understanding. It'll take a different approach, so think differently.

    The questions are totally random, and may be reworded. If you practiced a lot of "What's the best thing to do,", they are also "what do you do in order to not fail, or avoid".

    How was your general practice question score? Do you know which knowledge areas, process groups, type of questions you were weak with before you went into the exam?

    I coach many, many people in your situation. They have confidence, but maybe the confidence is the wrong type of confidence. There are two types generally:
    • I feel good.
    • I have demonstrated that I will be successful.
    Take a couple days to let the sting of failing to wash away, and then -

    • Use 20-50 practice questions (random preferred) to re-baseline. This will give you:
      • your new baseline
      • topics you are to review next
      • a breakdown of your total preparation.
    From here on, sit in practice as if you are in the real test - now you know what the real test feels like, Review daily 20-50 questions. Observe the results, and modify your review. You read through the whole material, you can now prioritize on what You are missing.

    When you are consistently scoring 80-85%, consider scheduling your next attempt. Schedule it about 2,3 weeks out. Use those next 2 or 3 weeks to practice focus and gain confidence as you retain knowledge. Practice your time management strategies. Look at strategies for attacking questions like you described.

    Again, you took the test, and have many knowns now - use that to your advantage.

    As you come up against concepts that you struggle with, reach out, and we'll crack the difficult questions. Until the exam is passed, your guiding light should be, "WHY is that the correct answer? WHY are the incorrect answers incorrect?" Demanding information from the questions you miss in preparation will clarify your personal doubts.

    The questions are totally random. Your next exam may be totally unlike this one. However the process of the exam is easily replicated in practice, and you will benefit from this.

    Note for others - this is beneficial for both people retaking and taking the exam for the first time. I would consider not scheduling the exam first and preparing for the date, but preparing and use the above benchmark for scheduling. It lowers anxiety, and is more indicative of a high probability of successfully passing.
     
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  3. _24034

    _24034 Member

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    Thank you, Sir, for your valuable insight. Your words have changed my perspective towards how to tackle the questions on the exams.
     
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  4. tim jerome

    tim jerome Well-Known Member
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    Remember - it takes a community to tackle large objectives. As long as you have access to your account, we're here to assist. It's also part of the oath we obligate ourselves to. (grin)
     
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  5. _44978

    _44978 Member

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  6. _44978

    _44978 Member

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    Hi Tim, I recently listened to a complete session (9 classes) of one of your classes, and I've also completed 100% of the online videos. After this was completed I took another simulated test and only increased my score by 5% - I took initial test before starting any studying. The scores I received aren't enough to pass the exam and I was hoping that Simplilearn would be more of a resource in helping me put together a study plan than what I've experienced. All the research I've done online indicates that you should have a study plan, but when I contact Simplilearn I am not getting any advice or direction from them other than I can pass the exam the first time with your course material. I have also purchased Rita Mulcahy's exam prep, but not sure how to manage all of this information in a way that actually adds value considering my limited time to study. Again, I do not feel like I'm getting any value out of my learning consultant or dollars spent at SL and would like to speak with someone who can actually assist me with best practices, learning plans, or perhaps provide me with advice on seeking a refund. Note, I've also submitted a ticket through customer service after having several discussions with my learning consultant - he emailed me and told me to submit a support ticket...not helpful.

    Thank you,

    Kim
     
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  7. tim jerome

    tim jerome Well-Known Member
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    Here's a start.

    What type of questions are you getting wrong? What are the topics? What are the knowledge areas, process groups? Is it change? Is it Scope? Are they math problems?

    The first thing we have issue with is identifying where to apply our focus to improve. If you treat this as a quality defect exercise, and work to eliminate defects, you may find improvement increases. This works well when you have truly random questions.

    What is your approach to the questions? Are you breaking the question down into scenario, true question, and options? Are you observing patterns in options? Are you struggling with 50-50 questions?

    We can discuss preparation strategies, and you can also look up on this forum - the true experts are the people who have most recently passed the exam.

    Here's my advice - start with just 5 random questions, and go through them as if in the real exam. Bring back the one that gave you the most struggle, and hopefully you got it wrong (believe it or not, every wrong question is an opportunity). Let's dissect it together, and see where the trickiness, so the next 5 questions you can observe similar patterns and see if you can get it right.

    If you're up to it, I am too - all PMPs, in fact. We have an ethical obligation and took an oath to support you. If you are frustrated, you care, and are the right person to pass the exam. It won't be easy, but the steps are simple. Drop an email with the next question you're struggling with on this thread, and I'll work through it with you.
     
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